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Please boost to help me find more geographers, I can't possibly be the only one in tootland.

@xlenc memememe, while I don’t actively study geography (I’m in high school lmao) I absolutely adore it

@CantFingerPick Luckily you dont need to study geographer in school to be a geographer! It really is the coolest field but it has an unearned reputation for being dry.

@xlenc woo that’s a relief!! I haven’t studied it as much as I like, but knowing about the world around us and how it was made it’s incredibly interesting to me

@xlenc I took one geography class in college and the prof had all the lectures recorded and the first one started with “My mom is always bragging to her friends about her son the geologist. And I have to tell her, ‘I’m not a geologist, Mom, I’m a geographer. It’s different’” and it was very petulant and it’s what I remember most😸 but it actually was a fun class

@KittenFish87 I study carceral geography and my mom still occasionally asks me to explain what prisons have to do with rocks. The confusion between the disciplines is so hard to untangle!

@xlenc 😹That makes me think of prisoners breaking rocks which makes it completely unfunny again but anyway that sounds really interesting and I’m completely unfamiliar with it.

@KittenFish87 I mean, in all fairness one of my case studies involves prison labor in a California quarry so that isn't actually far from the mark!

@xlenc Oh god that’s so depressing that is STILL a thing but at least it’s not going on with no one paying attention!

@xlenc I study linguistics and geography!!(like how natural environments influence the development of languages)

@mhaighday That's is such an interesting field and something I know very little about! Following.

@xlenc language development has a tremendous amount to do with climate and terrain and what works and what doesn’t (obviously not anymore i guess) but some cool facts are that tonal languages are mostly found in the tropics because those are the areas thought to have enough humidity to support fully lubricated vocal cords for their development

@xlenc meanwhile, languages that form high on mountains or close to the poles tend to have ejectives (p,t,k without breathing) and shorter/less complicated vowels because of the necessity to conserve heat while speaking

@mhaighday That is really interesting! How do you handle causation/correlation problems? In my hemisphere if the discipline environmental determinism is very taboo but there is always an open question of how we should model the impact of landscapes on human behavior.

@xlenc unfortunately it’s very hard to test correlation/causation because bc language creation isn’t really reproducible in a truly scientific way, and there tends to be much more layers of complexity, such as cycling, that make things hard to determine exactly. however, i absolutely believe that language arises from and adapts to the environment bc there is so much evidence that, even without proven correlation/causation, it’s hard to refute.

@xlenc My father was land surveyor, does it count ? 😅

@xlenc i, too, get unreasonably angry at people using bad map projections (though im doing economic geography rn)

@R850Mango Wait are you the guy who gave the awesome HEMA talk at AAG a few years back???

@xlenc god i wish, I've never given a talk ever

Sounds like a cool guy though

@R850Mango I just looked him up, his name is Dr. Nathan Clough and apparently he left academia to make swords. His talk was incredible though!

@xlenc What counts as a geographer? I consider myself a passionate amateur.

@xlenc Nice! I'm trying to do a lot more writing about the cities I've been in and around the way they feel, the way history intersects with memory. Thoughts on Luc Sante?

@MoMartin I havent read anything by him but I think travel writing is an undervalued part of geography, and Low Life has always sounded like a great book!

@xlenc Yeah, travel writing is good stuff, on occasion. You know the magazine Nowhere?

@xlenc well, I like geography, as traveler, human being and passionate about natural sciences. Not sure I count as a geographer, but I'll follow you to get more knowledge about your field =)

@xlenc I'm a historian, by degree, but geography is a big part of my historying. FWIW.

@paregorios Yeah there is more overlap between history and geography than most people in either discipline seem to want to admit. I've heard a lot of people say "historians work with time and we work with space" but when has anyone actually worked with one but not the other??

@xlenc I think some of the difference is about methodologies and source info/data (and how one organizes same), rather than fundamentally different areas of focus. Human activity varies in both time and space, and geographers, historians, archaeologists, etc. are all interested.

@paregorios True, but a lot of geographers use primarily historical archival materials, and GIS is just a fancy name for geospatial archive management and analysis, which is why so many historians are starting to use it. I know there are differences but it just surprises me that we don't hang out more.

@xlenc
I'm a city planning person who does spatial data and interactive mapping stuff, kinda close. Also good at directions.

@xlenc
Also I went to sfsu :3 took some geography courses

@eribloodlust oh awesome, my good friend just got their geography masters there!

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