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A document appears right:

early 15c., "a doctrine;" late 15c., "teaching, instruction" (senses now obsolete), from Old French document (13c.) "lesson, written evidence" and directly from Latin documentum "example, proof, lesson," in Medieval Latin "official written instrument, authoritative paper," from docere "to show, teach, cause to know," originally "make to appear right," causative of decere "be seemly, fitting,"

etymonline.com/word/document

Confession 

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Confession 

McClatchy Newspapers, the second-biggest chain in the US, has filed bankruptcy and is proposing selling itself to a hedge fund. Both major dailies in my area are McClatchy.

Getting bought by a hedge fund is usually . . . not good for papers.

#VultureCapitalism

It's like my entire life prepared me for this... 🤔

Usenet — Let's Return to Public Spaces

...Ah, Usenet. Birthplace of emoticons, flame wars, trolling, terms like “spam” and acronyms like “lol” and “brb”. What happened? To understand why it died, I can do no better than to point you to this Reddit post and this article....

Oh, cool, a 'splainer on Death of Usenet. Oh crap, that looks familiar....

october.substack.com/p/part-ii

news.ycombinator.com/item?id=2

@dredmorbius Other way round: _The Shockwave Rider_ (1975) was inspired by _Future Shock_ (1970). Read both in the late 1970s/early 80s. Have re-read the Shockwave Rider a few times since, not bothered with Future Shock. @kensanata

Weird idea. But hear me out! When you want to avoid all trackers and microtargeted ads - there is something called "print". Where the content is impressed on a thing called paper using a substance called ink! There are even shops where you can buy these things called "Newspaper"!

For the record, I have no problem paying for journalists, but I don’t think that should come at the expense of privacy. That’s why I’d pay cash for a paper instead

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@dredmorbius That's exactly the point. Previously, the foreign country past was the Second World War. My grandpa was weird, he had fought in it! He was a POW of the Americans. But now I find that my teenage years are weird. I had no mobile phone. The foreign past is creeping up on us. A bit like the Nothingness in the Neverending Story: we end up unable to relate to our own past selves.

@dredmorbius But then again my dad says that at university in Vienna, in post war Austria, most professors were all "crazy" in some way or another. They were all damaged by the war. And before that? The Long Peace has shifted our perspective and that, too, is part of the change: suddenly we care! In the old days, we would have sent those children off to war, hyperbolically speaking.

Addresses and phone numbers both require money and stability to retain. They can't be the only fallbacks from facebook. Email is better, fediverse is far better. When imagining fallbacks, imagine displaced populations without steady income. They need safety checkins, video calls, chat with presence notification, photo albums, goofy meme threads, fundraisers... Facebook has done a good job of positioning itself as a one-stop connectivity provider.

On the one hand: Beijing finds any expression of political sentiment in Hong Kong 'suspicious', and protestors crowdfunding self-support? Terrifying! How dare they!

On the other hand: the richly redolent odour of Steve Bannon and his far-right mates in the Committee on the Present Danger (version 4) haunts Hong Kong like a bad drain, so imagine all the weird money stuff swirling around TrumpWorld, but pointed at China rather than the Democratic Party, and you probably won't be far wrong.

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I wonder what's really going on here.

scmp.com/news/hong-kong/law-an

<<An 18-year-old man who police said received HK$48,000 (US$6,200) from activists raising money for anti-government protesters facing Hong Kong’s justice system has been arrested on suspicion of money laundering and drug trafficking, the force announced on Wednesday. >>

@dredmorbius Data is a liability, even our own‽ Soon we're running out of plots for dystopias to write.

DoorDash drivers use their forced arbitration clause to force DoorDash into arbitration

...No doubt, DoorDash never expected that so many would actually seek arbitration. Instead, in irony upon irony, DoorDash now wishes to resort to a class-wide lawsuit, the very device it denied to the workers, to avoid its duty to arbitrate. This hypocrisy will not be blessed, at least by this order....

theverge.com/2020/2/12/2113547

How many folks here use some kind of zettelkasten, writing and reference folder, personal wiki, or offline digital journal?

Bitcoin 

Man who refused to decrypt hard drives is free after four years in jail. Court holds that jail time to force decryption can't last more than 18 months. arstechnica.com/tech-policy/20

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